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Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Isaac Wardle and his Siblings

This reflects the work of Patti Call from Pleasant Grove, who is a genealogy major and descendant of Isaac Wardle.  She put this together for a class at BYU.  I have included a couple documents with regards to Joseph Wardle, Isaac next younger brother.  This would appear to be Joseph as on the marriage certificate the witnesses coincide with his brother and sister-in-law.  On the death certificate the age as well a father match. 


1. John Wardle was born 19 August 1811 in Ravenstone, Leicestershire, England to Thomas and Elizabeth Wardle.1 Ravenstone was a parish on the border of Derbyshire, and the area was known for its coal mines and picturesque farms. The site of the historic Battle of Bosworth was only 9 miles from Ravenstone.2 John married Mary Kinston Morton 12 November 1832 in Ravenstone parish.3 Family records say Mary was born in Shackerstone parish in 1806, but there is no evidence of this on the Shackerstone parish records.4 Some Wardle descendants have suggested that Mary’s middle name was Kinston and her maiden name was Morton, and that her parents were Edward Morton and Mary Kinston. I have not found any information to support this. My research indicates that Mary Kinston was possibly widowed after marrying a Morton and having one son, Thomas.

John, Mary and children Thomas, William, Isaac, Joseph, and Hannah lived in Ravenstone in 1841,5 and by 1851 the family (including their youngest son, James) had moved to Swannington, where John worked as a collier in the coal mines of Leicestershire and Derbyshire.6

Both John and Mary were baptized into the LDS church in while living in Leicestershire in 1845,7 and they immigrated to the United States on 30 March 1860 on the ship “Underwriter” with their youngest son, James.8 The Wardles were members of the Daniel Robinson Handcart Company.9 Mary is listed on the roster as “Mary Kinston Morton Wardle.” They were enumerated on the 1860 census while en route to Utah.10

After their arrival in Utah, they lived in a dugout above the west bank of the Jordan River in West Jordan, Utah for a few years with their son, William, and his family.11 By 1870, John and Mary were living in West Jordan with William and his family, and John was working as a farmer.12

John’s headstone in South Jordan cemetery says he died in 1875,13 but apparently he lived until after the enumeration of the 1880 census. He was living in South Jordan at that time with his granddaughter, Mary Smith.14 No record of his actual death has been found. Mary's death date is shown as 1872 on the South Jordan burial records, but there is no source for this information.15



i. Thomas Morton was born 23 Dec 1830 in Snarestone, Leicestershire, England16, according to the information on his death certificate. This was two years before the marriage of John Wardle and Mary Kinston Morton. I was unable to find marriage information for Mary Kinston and William Morton prior to 1830.

Thomas married Mary Ann Price in Cole Orton, Leicestershire on 30 Oct 1854 17. William Wardle was a witness to this marriage. Thomas listed William Morton, laborer as his father. In 1861 Thomas, Mary Ann, and their three children were living in Swannington, Leicestershire, and Thomas was working as a coal miner18. Also enumerated on the census was a visitor in the home, 27-year old Elizabeth Wardle. Elizabeth was a dress maker and said her birthplace was Bramford, Middlesex (see iii. Joseph Wardle).


Thomas and his family were living in Stavely, Derbyshire in 1871 and Thomas was working as a collier. Thomas immigrated to the US, arriving in New York on 23 July 1873 aboard the ship “Nevada” with his wife, Mary Ann, and their two sons. They were passengers in the steerage section of the ship.

In 1880, Thomas and his family were living in Coalville, Summit, Utah and Thomas was listed as a farmer. He was still living in Coalville in 1900, but was widowed at that time and living with his son Herbert and his family. In 1910 he was still in Coalville with Herbert’s family.

Thomas died 11 Jun 1911 in Coalville, Utah, at the age of 80. He was buried 13 Jun 1911 in the Coalville cemetery.


ii. William Wardle was born in 1833 in Ravenstone.19 He married Catherine White in England in 1854 in the parish of Whitwick.20 William and his family were living in Whitwick, Leicestershire in 1861, and he was working as a coal miner.21 

He joined the LDS church in 1848 at the age of 15,22 and immigrated to the United States on the ship “William Tapscott” in 1862.23 He and his wife and young daughter were members of the Homer Duncan Pioneer Company, which arrived in the Salt Lake Valley on 21 September 1862.24 After their arrival in Utah, William and Catherine lived in a dugout above the Jordan River for a number of years.25 In 1870, he and his family were living with his father, John Wardle, and William was working as a hired hand.26 He applied for and was granted a land patent in 1874. This property tract contained over 100 acres above the river and south of the present-day 9000 South Street in West Jordan.27 In 1880, he and his family were enumerated on the South Jordan census living only two houses away from his father, John, and William was working as a farmer.28

During the Blackhawk wars, William served as a member of the Salt lake Militia and helped guard the fort at Sanpete..29

William died in 1898 in West Jordan due to an apoplectic seizure,30 and was buried in the South Jordan city cemetery.31

iii. Isaac John Wardle was born in 1835 in Ravenstone, Leicestershire, England, and died in 1917 in Parker, Fremont, Idaho. His biography is found on page 5.


iv. Joseph Wardle was born 1 May 1837, but there is no record in the Ravenstone parish records of his birth.32 There is a record on the IGI of his LDS baptism in 1852,33 and that record lists his birth date. Joseph and Elizabeth Williams married on 30 May 1859 in Chesterfield, Derbyshire.34 Joseph died at the young age of 23 from smallpox and pneumonia on 12 Feb 1861.35 The Staveley Branch records of the LDS church say that Elizabeth, Joseph's widow, immigrated to Utah two months after his death.36 She was enumerated on the 1861 census with Thomas Morton’s family. Elizabeth departed England for Utah on 23 April 1861 on the ship “Underwriter” and is listed as Elizabeth Whardle on the Mormon Immigration Index37. There is no record of Elizabeth traveling with a specific pioneer company, but she was living with John, Mary, and James Wardle in West Jordan by October 1861 38, and in 1862 there was a marriage between Joseph Marriott and Elizabeth, widow of Joseph Wardell, in Salt Lake City.


v.  Hannah Wardle  was baptized in Whitwick, Leicestershire, England on 22 July 1839.39  There is no record of an LDS baptism for her, or any record of a death or burial in England.  Family records indicate the Hannah married a Fred Udy.40  A search of the Free BMD index shows a marriage between a Hannah wardle and Fredrick Udy in Leicestershire, 28 May 1855. 41  The certificate shows that the marriage was witnessed by William Wardle and Catherine Wardle 42, and Hannah would have been a very young bride of 16.  Apparently the Udy family immigrated to the US around the same time as the other Wardles as there are census records in Pennsylvania in 1860 43, 1970 44, and in Maryland in 1880 45 for a Hannah Udy, husband Fredrick and their children.  Hannah must have died sometime between 1880 and 1900 because Fred Udy is listed on the 1900 census as a widower 46.  He indicated that he immigrated to the US in 1860.  His obituary was printed in the Cumberland Evening Times47 after his death in 1906.


vi.  James Wardle, the youngest of John and Mary Wardle's children, was born 16 October 1841 in Ravenstone, Leicestershire, England48. He was 18 years old when he immigrated with his parents to Utah in 1860.47 James was married on 3 Feb 1866 to Mary Dixon,49 and shortly after the birth of their first child, they apostatized from the LDS church and left to “begin with the Josephites” in Missouri.51 They were living in Washington Township, De Kalb, Missouri according to the 1870 census,52 but ten years later, they were again in Utah, living in Union, Salt Lake county.53 It is likely that the family still affiliated with the Reorganized LDS church (Josephites) after their return to Utah. According to the local newspaper, an “Elder Wardle” of the RLDS Church was teaching in the Salt Lake area in 1876.54

James later worked as a farmer who owned his own farm in 1900 in West Jordan,55 and on the 1910 census, he claimed to be a naturalized citizen.56 He died on 17 Dec 1917,57 only 47 days after the death of his brother, Isaac. He was buried in the South Jordan city cemetery.58



2.  Isaac John Wardle was born in Ravenstone, Leicestershire, England on 14 Jun 1835.59 According to family records, he worked as a rope maker at age 7, and then started working in a coal mine.60 Isaac joined the LDS church in 1853,61 and in 1856 he immigrated to the United States on the ship “Horizon”.62 Since he was traveling alone, he agreed to push a handcart containing camping equipment and an ill boy, Langley A. Bailey.63 They left Nebraska with the ill-fated Edward Martin Handcart Company in late summer of 1856 and after many hardships, arrived in Salt Lake City on 30 November 1856.64
Isaac married Martha Egbert in 1859,65 and they were living in West Jordan in 1860.66 A second wife, Mary Ann (Ashton), died in childbirth in 1869. In 1870, he was living in South Jordan with wives Martha and Sophia (Myers), and four children.67 Four years later, Isaac received a land patent in December 1874, and farmed over 100 acres of ground above the Jordan River and just north of the present-day 11400 South Street.68

In January 1879, Isaac departed Utah for a mission in Liverpool, England,69 and later records indicate he was called to serve as a traveling elder.70 His service was short, because in September 1879, he was listed as a returning elder in the Deseret News.71 By the time of the 1880 census he was once again in South Jordan, working as a farmer.72

As pressure to discontinue polygamy mounted, Isaac was arrested on 4 June 1890 for practicing unlawful cohabitation. He appeared in court and was bound over for trial.73 The Wardles took measures to avoid future prosecution; on the 1900 census, wife Sophia was recorded as a head of household, and claimed to be a widow.74

Unexpectedly, on 10 October 1901, Isaac Wardle went to the local bank, withdrew $100, and disappeared.75 There were some who feared he had been murdered, but his local bishop said that financial burdens may have played a role in his disappearance.76 Six months later, in April 1902, he turned up in St. Anthony, Idaho, having sojourned in Oregon for the previous months.77

Isaac died in Parker, Fremont, Idaho on 30 October 1917, and his funeral was held 2 November 1917 with Mr. Langley Bailey as a speaker.78 Brother Bailey credited Isaac Wardle for saving his life at Martin's Cove, stating, “There lies my human horse. Had it not been for him, my bones would have been bleached on the plains a long time ago.”79 Isaac was buried in the Parker city cemetery.80

  1.  Church of England. Ravenstone Parish Registers, DE 2704/1. Leicester and Rutland Record Office, Long Street, Wigston Magna, Leicester LE18 2AH. Microfiche in possession of Patti Call, Pleasant Grove, UT, USA.
2    Leapton, Michael. “Great Britain” (DK Publishing, New York, NY, 1995), pg. 317-18.
3    Church of England. Ravenstone Bishop's Transcripts, FHL British film 498117. Family History Library, 35 N. West Temple, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.
4    Church of England. Shackerstone Parish Registers, DE 1103/6. Leicester and Rutland Record Office. Microfiche in possession of Patti Call, Pleasant Grove, UT, USA.
5    1841 Census Returns of England and Wales. Leicestershire, Ravenstone parish. E. D. 6, Folio 7, page 11, John Wardle household. Ancestry.com [database online], <www.ancestry.com>.
6    1851 Census Returns of England and Wales, Leicestershire, Swannington parish, E. D. 6, page 8, John Wardle household. Ancestry.com [database online], <www.ancestry.com>.
7    Egbert, Crilla Myers. Family Records of Crilla Myers Egbert. Compiled before 1964. Records in possession of Patti Call, Pleasant Grove, UT, USA.
8    Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Mormon Immigration Index. John Wardle entry. CD-ROM, (Salt Lake City: Intellectual Reserve, 2000).
9    Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Pioneer Company List, Church History Library and Archives [database online],  <www.lds.org/churchhistory/library/pioneercompany>.
10   1860 United States Federal Census, Platt Territory, Nebraska, pg 17.
11    Lonnie and Annette Holt. History of South Jordan, vol. 2 (Privately published: 1989), pg. 5.
12    1870 United States Federal Census, Salt Lake Territory, Utah, West Jordan post office, pg. 13, John Wardell household. National Archives M593_1611. Ancestry.com [database online], <www.ancestry.com>.
13    “Wardle, John.” Utah State History Burials. 2008. Utah Division of Community and Culture. 15 Feb 2009 <www.history.utah.gov/apps/burials>.
14    1880 United States Federal Census, South Jordan, Salt Lake County, Utah, E. D. 59, pg. 7, John B. Smith household. National Archives T9_1337. Ancestry.com [database online], <www.ancestry.com>.
15    “Wardle, Mary.” Utah State History Burials. 2008. Utah Division of Community and Culture. 15 Feb 2009 <www.history.utah.gov/apps/burals>.
16 Utah State Archives, 346 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City, UT, USA, Thomas Morton death certificate printed 12 Dec 2008.  Database online, <archives.utah.gov/research/indexes/index.html>.
17  Morton-Price marriage, Parish church of ColeOrton, Leicestershire, England, 30 Oct 1854. Certificate #716318 obtained from the General Record Office, London, England, and in the possession of Patti Call, Pleasant Grove, UT, USA.
18 1861 Census Returns of England and Wales, Leicestershire, Swannington parish, E. D. 6, pg 24, folio 19. Thomas Morton household. Ancestry.com [database online], <www.ancestry.com>
19    Church of England. Ravenstone Bishop's Transcripts, FHL British film 498117.
20    Wardle-White marriage, Parish church of Whitwick, Leicestershire, England, 25 Dec 1854. Certificate #125304 obtained from the General Record Office, London, England, and in the possession of Patti Call, Pleasant Grove, UT, USA.
21    1861 Census Returns of England and Wales, Leicestershire, Whitwick parish, E. D. 9, pg. 17, William Wardle household. Ancestry.com [database online], <www.ancestry.com>.
22    William Wardle entry, International Genealogical Index (Salt Lake City: Family History Library, 2008), citing film number 962442. FamilySearch.org [database online], <www.familysearch.org>.
23    William Wardle entry, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Mormon Immigration Index. CD-ROM, (Salt Lake City: Intellectual Reserve, 2000).
24    William Wardle entry, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Pioneer Company List, Church History Library and Archives [database online],  <www.lds.org/churchhistory/library/pioneercompany>.
25    Holt, History of South Jordan, vol. 2, pg. 5.
26    1870 United States Federal Census, Salt Lake Territory, Utah, West Jordan post office, pg. 13, John Wardell household. National Archives M593_1611. Ancestry.com [database online], <www.ancestry.com>.
27    United States of America General Land Office. Land patent granted to William Wardle, West Jordan, UT, 1 Dec 1874. Bureau of Land Management, Utah State Office, 440 W. 200 S. St 500, Salt Lake City, UT. Certified copy in possession of Patti Call, Pleasant Grove, UT, USA.
28    1880 United States Federal Census, South Jordan, Salt Lake County, Utah, E. D. 59, pg. 7, William Wardell household. National Archives T9_1337. Ancestry.com [database online], <www.ancestry.com>.
29 Lonnie and Annette Holt. History of South Jordan, vol. 2 (Privately published: 1989),
30    Salt Lake County Coroner's Records, 1851-1877, pg. 18, record 723, William Wardle entry. FHL US/CAN film 485535.
31    "Wardle, William." Utah State History Burials. 2008. Utah Division of Community and Culture. 15 Feb 2009 <www.history.utah.gov/apps/burials>.
32    Church of England. Ravenstone Bishop's Transcripts, FHL British film 498117.
33    Joseph Wardle entry, International Genealogical Index (Salt Lake City: Family History Library, 2008), citing batch number 6940062, source call number 0087034. FamilySearch.org [database online], <www.familysearch.org>.
34    Wardle-Williams marriage. Parish church of Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England, 30 May 1859. Certificate #168236 obtained from the GRO, London, England, and in the possession of Patti Call, Pleasant Grove, UT, USA.
35    Joseph Wardle death record. Certificate #219446 obtained from the GRO, London, England, and in the possession of Patti Call, Pleasant Grove, UT, USA.
36 Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Stavely Branch Records. FHL British film 87304 itam 5.
37. Elizabeth Whardle entry, Church of Jesus christ of latter-day Saints.  Mormon Immigration Index.
38. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  West Jordan, Utah Record of Early Members. FHL US/CAN, film 27416
39. Church of England, Whitwick Bishop's Transcripts, FHL British film 596077.
40. Egbert, Family Records of Crilla Myers Egbert.
41. Hannah Wardle search, FreeBMD[databae online], <www.freebind.org>.. Marriage recorin in Jun 1855, Ashby-de-la-Zouch district.  Marriage record was requested from the GRO on 19 Jan 2009.
42. Udy-Wardle marriage.  Parish church of Whitwick, Leicestershire, England, 28 May 1855.  Certificate #167409 obtained form the GRO, London, England, and in possesion of Patti Call, Pleasant Grove, UT
43 1860 United States Federal Census, Schuylkill Cunty, Pennsylvania, Frailey Post office, Fredrick Udy.
44. 1870 United States Federal Census, Mifflin County, Pennsylvania, McVeytown post office, pg. 15, Frederick Udy household.  National Archives M593_1375.Ancestry.com [update online], <www.ancestry.com>.
45    1880 United States Federal Census, Westernport, Allegany, Maryland, E. D. 7, image 328, Frederick Udy household. National Archives T9_493. Ancestry.com [database online], <www.ancestry.com>.
46.1900 United States Federal Census, Lonaconing, Allegany, Maryland, E. D. 111,  sheet 7A. William Reese household.
47 The Evening Times, 6 October 1906, page 6.
48    Church of England. Ravenstone Bishop's Transcripts, FHL British film 498117.
49    Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Pioneer Company List, Church History Library and Archives [database online],  <www.lds.org/churchhistory/library/pioneercompany>.
50    James Wardle entry, International Genealogical Index (Salt Lake City: Family History Library, 2008), no source information is available. FamilySearch.org [database online], <www.familysearch.org>.
51    Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. West Jordan, Utah Record of Early Members. FHL US/CAN, film 27416.
52    1870 United States Federal Census, De Kalb county, Missouri, Washington township, pg. 529, image 219, James Wardell household. National Archives M593_774. Ancestry.com [database online], <www.ancestry.com>.
  53    1880 United States Federal Census, Union, Salt Lake County, Utah, E. D. 56, James Wadle (sic) household. National Archives T9_1337. Ancestry.com [database online], <www.ancestry.com>. 54    “The Reorganized Church,” Salt Lake Tribune, 24 May 1876, pg. 4. Utah Digital Newspapers [database online], <http://udn.lib.utah.edu/u?/slt3,3896>.
55    1900 United States Federal Census, West Jordan, Salt Lake County, Utah, E. D. 67, pg. 13A, James Wardle household.  National Archives T623_1685. Ancestry.com [database online], <www.ancestry.com>.
56    1910 United States Federal Census, East Jordan, Salt Lake County, Utah, E. D. 85, image 217, James Wardle household. National Archives T624_1605. Ancestry.com [database online], <www.ancestry.com>.
57    Utah State Archives, 346 S. Rio Grande, Salt Lake City, UT, USA, James Wardle death certificate  #1969 printed 12 Dec 2008.  Database online, <archives.utah.gov/research/indexes/index.html>.
58    "Wardle, James." Utah State History Burials. 2008. Utah Division of Community and Culture. 15 Feb 2009 <www.history.utah.gov/apps/burials>.
59    Church of England, Ravenstone Bishop's Transcripts, FHL British film 498117.
60    Egbert, Family Records of Crilla Myers Egbert.
61    Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. South Jordan, Utah Record of Early Members. FHL US/CAN film 27285.
62    Crilla Myers Egbert, History of Isaac John Wardle (Privately published: 1964). Copy in possession of Patti Call, Pleasant Grove, UT, USA.
63    Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Reminiscences of Isaac J. Wardle, individual pioneer search, Church History Library and  Archives [database online], <www.lds.org/churchhistory/library/pioneercompany>.
64    Egbert, History of Isaac John Wardle, 1964.
65    Egbert, Family Records of Crilla Myers Egbert.
66   1860 United States Federal Census, Salt Lake Territory Utah, West Jordan post office, pg. 287, dwelling 2111, family 430, Isaac Wardle household. National Archives M653_1313, pg. 69, image 71. Ancestry.com, online <www.ancestry.com>.
67    1870 United States Federal Census, Salt Lake Territory, Utah, Salt Lake post office, pg. 8, Isaac Wardle household. National Archives M593_1611. Ancestry.com [database online], <www.ancestry.com>.
68    United States of America General Land Office. Land patent granted to Isaac Wardle, West Jordan, UT, 1 Dec 1874. Bureau of Land Management, Utah State Office, 440 W. 200 S. St 500, Salt Lake City, UT, USA. Certified copy in possession of Patti Call, Pleasant Grove, UT, USA.
69    “Local and Other Matters,” Deseret News, 29 Jan. 1879, pg. 1. Utah Digital Newspapers [database online], <http://udn.lib.utah.edu/u?/deseretnews3,2220207>.
70    “Local and Other Matters,” Deseret News, 26 Mar. 1879, pg. 9. Utah Digital Newspapers [database online], <http://udn.lib.utah.edu/u?/deseretnews3,2232569>.
71    “List of Passengers,” Deseret News, 24 Sep. 1879, pg. 5. Utah Digital Newspapers [database online], <http://udn.lib.utah.edu/u?/deseretnews3,2232569>.
72    1880 United States Federal Census, South Jordan, Salt Lake County, Utah, E. D. 59, pg. 5, Isaac Wordell household. National Archives T9_1337. Ancestry.com [database online], <www.ancestry.com>.
73    “Current Events,” Deseret News, 14 Jun. 1890, pg. 24. Utah Digital Newspapers [database online], <http://udn.lib.utah.edu./u?/deseretnews4,13899>.
74    1900 United States Federal Census, South Jordan, Salt Lake County, Utah, E. D. 66, sheet 10, Isaac Wardle household. Sophia Wardle is listed in the adjoining property. National Archives T623_1685. Ancestry.com [database online], <www.ancestry.com>.
75   “Pioneer is Missing,” Deseret Evening News, 28 Oct. 1901, pg. 8. Utah Digital Newspapers [database online], <http://udn.lib.utah.edu/u?/den1,46011>.
76    “Why Wardle Left,” Deseret Evening News, 11 Nov. 1901, pg. 1. Utah Digital Newspapers [database online], <http://udn.lib.utah.edu/u?/den1,48246>.
77    “Utah State News,” Davis County Clipper, 28 April 1902, pg. 2. Utah Digital Newspapers [database online], <http://udn.lib.utah.edu/u?/davis1,25654>.
78    “Passing of a Pioneer,” Rexburg Journal, 2 Nov. 1917, vol. 30, number 22, pg. 1. 77    Egbert, History of Isaac John Wardle, 1964. 78    Flamm Mortuary, funeral record for Isaac Wardle, 1917.
79    Egbert, History of Isaac John Wardle, 1964.
80    Flamm Mortuary, funeral record for Isaac Wardle, 1917.












Sunday, March 25, 2012

Thanking people who have sent me stuff

This week has been incredible with stuff that has come through the email.  First I noticed a past email I had received with attachments and found an article about coal mining as well as two partriarchal blessing for Isaac Wardle.  This email was from Lynn Wardle.
I then received email with regards to Joseph Wardle, Isaac's brother from Iva Wardle Beckstead.  This recounted his marriage in 1859 and then his death in 1861 due to chicken pox and pneumonia.  I now have wedding documentation as well as death certificate.  He apparently had moved to Chesterfield and worked as a miner.
Lastly, I received form Denise Croft, which included newspaper articles form when Isaac was missing in 1901.  Family had assumed he had met foul play.  As soon as I figure out how to post these documents I will.  Billy

Chapter Review: ****The Child

This is a chapter I found in an email from Lynn Wardle.  It was a book published in 1965 and edited by William Kessen.  The chapter included is called "Children in Mines and Collieries."  It is for the most port the testimony of Earl Anthony Ashley Cooper before parliament in conjunction with with Mines Act of 1842.   The testimony include graphic descriptions of the conditions in the mines, and particularly with regard to children working in the minds.  It also talks about women working in the minds.  I talks about the age of children when they first enter the mines, as young as 5 years, the long days of work, as much as 14 hours, and that the children miss seeing the sun all day, and often have a mile or two to walk home after work.  It talked about the conditions in the mines, low ceilings, damp conditions and poor ventilation.  It started to trigger anxiety reactions in me just to think about some of these conditions.  The children were generally almost naked as they worked.

He quoted a preacher who talked of how working in the mines corrupted the children, but more than corrupted, perhaps caused them to be cynical.  He also talked about the physical abuse some of the children and women were subject to by the men who worked in the mines. 

The mining act of 1842 started to change the environment in the mines, however passing a law and enforcing it are different things.  I appreciate the information, and added it to chapter two of Isaac's book.

Monday, March 19, 2012

Book Review: ****Charlote's Rose

This book is a novel, a fictionalized version of the third handcart company.  However there are somethings in this book which are interesting, and worth of inclusion in Isaac's history, and also the story of the Ashton girls.

This book is a bout handcart members from Wales.  A woman in the company dies in childbirth, and her husband is too grief stricken to take the baby.  A young girl, age thirteen, takes the baby, and cares for her and carries her on her back across the plains.  The thought of someone taking care of someone else points me to the Ashtons.  I wonder who cared for the baby Sarah Ann, that was born near Florence, when Great Grandmother Sarah Ashton passed away.  The baby lived for almost two weeks, so someone in the company must have been a wet nurse to the baby; and somebody else probably took care of the baby.  When William Ashton left the company, the other girl, while supervised by a family, I am sure, were basically in the care and supervision of Betsy, eleven years old at the time.  When Betsy passed away, they would have been in the care of others, as orphan girls.

One of the characters in the book, John, is escaping the coal mines as part of his trek West.  The dialogue is very interesting. 

Boyfriend talking about working in the coal mines.
“I am free here,” he says.  “I can stand up straight.  Stretch out my arms and legs.  Look up whenever I choose and see the sun.  You have no idea what it is like to go for days and days without seeing the sun because you are buried in the belly of a mine.”
…”Papa took me to work with him the morning I turned thirteen,” he says.  “I felt proud of myself as I walked in the colliery with him.  I was a man.  Just like Papa.  Just like my brother,…”
“ By the time Papa and I reached the pithead, I was sick with excitement.  I couldn’t wait to enter the mines with the rest of the men.  I stepped into the crowded pit cage, waiting to be lowered to the bottom.
“The dropped us nearly a quarter of a mile.
“The ride was fast and hard and dark.  Bits of dust and coal blew into my face.  Wind whistled in my ears.  I screamed, Charlotte.  In front of all of them.…”
John shrugs, “I hated the deep darkness of the pit and the way is smothers a soul like a filthy blanket.  I hated tasting dust and slithering on my stomach through tight places.  And I hated myself for hating it all….”
The ast bit of information, useful for our study of Isaac and his part in the handcarts, is included in a letter to the Reader, after the story is complete.  It explains the reason for travel by handcart. 
“A Letter to the Reader “
Nineteenth-century Mormonism, with its emphasis on social equality and communal living, had a special appeal for Europe’s poor; who suffered under rigid class systems favoring the rich and powerful.  For this purpose, the Perpetual Emigrating Fund was established—to outfit emigrants … and assist them in reaching Zion. 
    Economic reverses in the territory of Utah during the 1850s, however, strapped the church’s resources.  Brigham Young therefore conceived of a radical plan to cut costs while providing European church members with an opportunity to emigrate to America.  Nothing like it had been tried before: Emigrants would pull their own small wagons across prairies and over mountains to reach their new home.  (243-244)
Charlotte’s Rose,  A.E. Cannon, Wendy Lamb Books, 2002, New York, N.Y.

It was fun to find some useful information, when I was mostly reading for fun.

Sunday, March 4, 2012

Isaac Wardle History: Forward


Foreword

            I am attempting to write a history of Isaac Wardle, Mormon pioneer.  I have in my possession two autobiographical histories, and four other histories written about him.  I now also have access to Isaac's missionary letters.
In this history I am going to attempt to tell the story of the Martin Handcart Company; but to do so in such a way that it will give some idea of the things that Isaac went through during this journey.  A fellow pioneer said, “The whole story of the travels and sufferings of the Martin and Tyler Handcart companies that arrived in Salt Lake City on the Sunday of Nov. 30, 1856, can never be written or told.”  (Jones, Samuel, Church History)  This is a true statement.  The entire story cannot be told, not even Isaac’s entire story.  John Jaques also echoed this sentiment.  “No human being knows it all.”  (Jaques, Church History)  But maybe we can have bring to light a little bit more of the picture, and thereby appreciate the man. 
            Of course there was more to Isaac’s life than the handcart trek.  This history will also explore these other scenes; before his trek, as well as his life in Utah and Idaho after arriving in Zion.  I will present the things going on around him at the time, and try to relate them to Isaac.  Of course in this, we may have to draw some of our own conclusions.  We cannot know in all occasions, how Isaac reacted to and responded to events around him.  But we can know the scope of what his happening, and infer how this may have affected him.