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Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Ileen Jane Wright Wardle

Some more pictures of my momma.
Hyrum counter
old rocking chair

With Dad in family room, Hyrum

Mom with Santa aka Tom Smith

In Malad with Buffie

In the kitchen
With Aaron and Joey Nov. 25, 1979

Sarah doing mom's hair

 Dining room in Hyrum

Hyrum

Hyrum with Sara

Restaurant with baby?

In Pocatello

Mom and Sara in the kitchen

Airport, Weldon leaving on mission or coming home

In the kitchen

Sunday, April 6, 2014

Aunt Carol Ann Fisher Haws: Sheri's Aunt


Sheri and I went to Aunt Carol’s memorial Saturday.  There was a lot about Aunt Carol I didn’t know.  She taught at San Jose State in the theater department for 27 years.  There is a scholarship and a theatrical award there in her name.  She choreographed the very first Temple pageant, and four altogether.  She was apparently very good at comedic dance.  She was a modern dance instructor.  Her specialty was comedic dance.  I guess she had a great influence on lots of people.  Uncle Von talked about how he met Carol.  It was at church.  He was attending with a former missionary companion.  He saw her from behind, and noticed her neck.  Aunt Carol had two boys from a previous marriage.  Von went right up and sat by her, and after the meeting told her he would like to see her again.  Of course Aunt Carol was busy with raising two boys and work and was hesitant, but Von made her dinner.  He made stuffed pork chops.  He had been to France on his mission and could cook French food.  He was already working as an architect.
Aunt Carol was also very involved in genealogy work.  She found the original Fischer who immigrated to America.  After retirement she took up rug making winning a presitigious competition for a hook-rug she made called "Sun Moon and Stars."

This is her obituary: http://www.myers-mortuary.com/obituary/Carol-Anne-Fisher-Smith-Haws/Farr-West-UT/1332733
Carol Anne Fisher Smith Haws, dancer, director, and choreographer, died in a nursing facility in Farr West, Utah on January 14, 2014, at the age of 80. She was born in Maricopa, California on January 2, 1934, to Frank Truman Fisher and Nellie Rex Smith Fisher, the third of five children. She moved with her family from Maricopa to Santa Maria, then briefly to Alhambra, then to Altadena, where she lived until her first marriage. She was educated at Pasadena City College, Brigham Young University, the University of Utah, and UCLA, where she earned her master's degree in dance. She married Virgil Bushman Smith in 1953; they had two sons and were later divorced. She married Ervin Lavon (Von) Haws in 1961; they had five more children. They were later divorced but subsequently remarried and remained together until her death.
Carol's life, passion and profession was dance from the time she was ten years old until her premature retirement at 55, forced on her by spine surgery. She studied with William Christensen at the University of Utah and with Evelyn LeMone at the LeMone Studio in Pasadena, California. She taught for 27 years in the dance department at San Jose State University, where the Carol Anne Haws Award for excellence in performance is still given annually, along with the Carol Anne Haws Scholarship in the department of theater arts. She directed and choreographed a great many shows at the university, including "West Side Story" and "Carousel." She was active in community theater as well, directing "1776," "The Boyfriend," and "Pirates of Penzance" among other musicals and operettas, and directed performances of the Prune Hollow Choral Society, a company of kids ages 14 to 18 who sang and danced their way throughout the Bay Area and toured Romania, Mexico, Hawaii and other places. She choreographed the children of the Tabard Theatre Company in their performance of "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory." She also directed and choreographed hundreds of dance recitals before, during, and after her career at San Jose State. She directed/choreographed the LDS Church's Oakland Temple Pageant four times, beginning with the very first one that marked the opening of the temple.
Carol also channeled her energies into genealogy, finding herself fascinated by the implied stories contained in parish records, birth and death dates, marriages, the way certain names vanish from one village and turn up in another. "Everybody has one story to tell," she liked to say, and she followed the stories she found in the documents and microfilms with eagerness and sympathy. She was especially pleased to locate our immigrant Fisher (then spelled Fischer) ancestor in a small town in Germany and to learn from the local parish clerk that the ancestor was, according to the record, "Much given to stealing."
She found an outlet for her visual artistry in rug-making, winning first prize in a rug-hooking competition in Carmel, California for a rug called "Sun, Moon, and Stars."

She was a dedicated member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She is survived by her husband Von, and her children, Matthew (Debora), Jeffery (Jan), Gretchen Myers (Douglas), Aaron, Rachel Helwig (Keith), Forrest (Cheryl), Nellie Gratton (Jeff), numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren; a sister, Sylvia Bevan (James), and a brother, Franklin (Rosemary Beless). She was preceded in death by her parents, a sister, Mary Lou, and a brother, Truman. - See more at: http://www.myers-mortuary.com/obituary/Carol-Anne-Fisher-Smith-Haws/Farr-West-UT/1332733#sthash.xaROC7Um.dpuf

Carol Anne Fisher Smith Haws, dancer, director, and choreographer, died in a nursing facility in Farr West, Utah on January 14, 2014, at the age of 80. She was born in Maricopa, California on January 2, 1934, to Frank Truman Fisher and Nellie Rex Smith Fisher, the third of five children. She moved with her family from Maricopa to Santa Maria, then briefly to Alhambra, then to Altadena, where she lived until her first marriage. She was educated at Pasadena City College, Brigham Young University, the University of Utah, and UCLA, where she earned her master's degree in dance. She married Virgil Bushman Smith in 1953; they had two sons and were later divorced. She married Ervin Lavon (Von) Haws in 1961; they had five more children. They were later divorced but subsequently remarried and remained together until her death.
Carol's life, passion and profession was dance from the time she was ten years old until her premature retirement at 55, forced on her by spine surgery. She studied with William Christensen at the University of Utah and with Evelyn LeMone at the LeMone Studio in Pasadena, California. She taught for 27 years in the dance department at San Jose State University, where the Carol Anne Haws Award for excellence in performance is still given annually, along with the Carol Anne Haws Scholarship in the department of theater arts. She directed and choreographed a great many shows at the university, including "West Side Story" and "Carousel." She was active in community theater as well, directing "1776," "The Boyfriend," and "Pirates of Penzance" among other musicals and operettas, and directed performances of the Prune Hollow Choral Society, a company of kids ages 14 to 18 who sang and danced their way throughout the Bay Area and toured Romania, Mexico, Hawaii and other places. She choreographed the children of the Tabard Theatre Company in their performance of "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory." She also directed and choreographed hundreds of dance recitals before, during, and after her career at San Jose State. She directed/choreographed the LDS Church's Oakland Temple Pageant four times, beginning with the very first one that marked the opening of the temple.
Carol also channeled her energies into genealogy, finding herself fascinated by the implied stories contained in parish records, birth and death dates, marriages, the way certain names vanish from one village and turn up in another. "Everybody has one story to tell," she liked to say, and she followed the stories she found in the documents and microfilms with eagerness and sympathy. She was especially pleased to locate our immigrant Fisher (then spelled Fischer) ancestor in a small town in Germany and to learn from the local parish clerk that the ancestor was, according to the record, "Much given to stealing."
She found an outlet for her visual artistry in rug-making, winning first prize in a rug-hooking competition in Carmel, California for a rug called "Sun, Moon, and Stars."

She was a dedicated member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She is survived by her husband Von, and her children, Matthew (Debora), Jeffery (Jan), Gretchen Myers (Douglas), Aaron, Rachel Helwig (Keith), Forrest (Cheryl), Nellie Gratton (Jeff), numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren; a sister, Sylvia Bevan (James), and a brother, Franklin (Rosemary Beless). She was preceded in death by her parents, a sister, Mary Lou, and a brother, Truman.
The family wishes to express their thanks to Pamela Hawkes and the staff at Memory Lane Care Home for the excellent and dedicated care they provided to their mother in the final years of her life. - See more at: http://www.myers-mortuary.com/obituary/Carol-Anne-Fisher-Smith-Haws/Farr-West-UT/1332733#sthash.xaROC7Um.dpuf

Carol Anne Fisher Smith Haws, dancer, director, and choreographer, died in a nursing facility in Farr West, Utah on January 14, 2014, at the age of 80. She was born in Maricopa, California on January 2, 1934, to Frank Truman Fisher and Nellie Rex Smith Fisher, the third of five children. She moved with her family from Maricopa to Santa Maria, then briefly to Alhambra, then to Altadena, where she lived until her first marriage. She was educated at Pasadena City College, Brigham Young University, the University of Utah, and UCLA, where she earned her master's degree in dance. She married Virgil Bushman Smith in 1953; they had two sons and were later divorced. She married Ervin Lavon (Von) Haws in 1961; they had five more children. They were later divorced but subsequently remarried and remained together until her death.
Carol's life, passion and profession was dance from the time she was ten years old until her premature retirement at 55, forced on her by spine surgery. She studied with William Christensen at the University of Utah and with Evelyn LeMone at the LeMone Studio in Pasadena, California. She taught for 27 years in the dance department at San Jose State University, where the Carol Anne Haws Award for excellence in performance is still given annually, along with the Carol Anne Haws Scholarship in the department of theater arts. She directed and choreographed a great many shows at the university, including "West Side Story" and "Carousel." She was active in community theater as well, directing "1776," "The Boyfriend," and "Pirates of Penzance" among other musicals and operettas, and directed performances of the Prune Hollow Choral Society, a company of kids ages 14 to 18 who sang and danced their way throughout the Bay Area and toured Romania, Mexico, Hawaii and other places. She choreographed the children of the Tabard Theatre Company in their performance of "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory." She also directed and choreographed hundreds of dance recitals before, during, and after her career at San Jose State. She directed/choreographed the LDS Church's Oakland Temple Pageant four times, beginning with the very first one that marked the opening of the temple.
Carol also channeled her energies into genealogy, finding herself fascinated by the implied stories contained in parish records, birth and death dates, marriages, the way certain names vanish from one village and turn up in another. "Everybody has one story to tell," she liked to say, and she followed the stories she found in the documents and microfilms with eagerness and sympathy. She was especially pleased to locate our immigrant Fisher (then spelled Fischer) ancestor in a small town in Germany and to learn from the local parish clerk that the ancestor was, according to the record, "Much given to stealing."
She found an outlet for her visual artistry in rug-making, winning first prize in a rug-hooking competition in Carmel, California for a rug called "Sun, Moon, and Stars."

She was a dedicated member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She is survived by her husband Von, and her children, Matthew (Debora), Jeffery (Jan), Gretchen Myers (Douglas), Aaron, Rachel Helwig (Keith), Forrest (Cheryl), Nellie Gratton (Jeff), numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren; a sister, Sylvia Bevan (James), and a brother, Franklin (Rosemary Beless). She was preceded in death by her parents, a sister, Mary Lou, and a brother, Truman. - See more at: http://www.myers-mortuary.com/obituary/Carol-Anne-Fisher-Smith-Haws/Farr-West-UT/1332733#sthash.xaROC7Um.dpuf

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Cousins in Rigby

I am not sure when this is, but I think this occasion may be when my Grandfather Wardle passed away.  Charlie and I are wanting to sleep, while everyone else wants to stay up all night. The living room in Rigby wasn't large, but it looks like we all fit.


I and Charlie sleeping, Ray, Danny, Weldon, Reed

Monday, March 31, 2014

Please help Identify

This was with some of my father's pictures.  I was thinking the woman in the middle was my Grandmother Melissa Shaw Wardle, but she was the youngest of three sisters.  Any other ideas? She was 9 years younger than her oldest sister, seven years younger the the next oldest.

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Charlie Found this Story About our Great-great-great Grandfather

Thomas Evans Jeremy
    Thomas Evans Jeremy, a patriarch in the Salt Lake Stake of Zion, was born in the parish of Llanegwad, Caermarthenshire, South Wales, July 11th, 1815. He was raised on a farm and received a good education. After his marriage, he joined the Baptist denomination, but believed the principles of Mormonism from the time he first heard them proclaimed. March 3rd, 1846, he was baptized by Elder Dan Jones, he being one of the first who embraced the fullness of the gospel in Wales. On the evening of the day of his baptism, he was ordained to the office of a Priest and soon afterwards, when the Lianybyther branch of the Church was organized, he was appointed to preside over the same. By his continued efforts, being assisted also by other Elders, four new branches were raised up in the immediate neighborhood of where he resided.
    At that time Elder Jeremy lived on a large farm, which he had rented from a rich land-owner, who was an enemy to the Mormons, became very angry when he heard that Thomas E. Jeremy had united himself with them, and furthermore was spearing the doctrines of his creed among his other renters. On one occasion when Elder Jeremy brought him the half-yearly rent, this man commended to abuse him and finally broke out in a passion, saying, "These dammed night-dippers, (meaning the Mormons) will lead you down to Hell". Brother Jeremy in his usual calm and conservative manner, told him in reply that although he knew his duty to his landlord, and would do what was right to him, he considered it his privilege to serve God according to his own conscience; and he felt it to be his duty to obey God more than man. This exasperated the landlord, who commenced to curse and swear, but was immediately seized by a strange and mighty power, which hurled him back in his chair and made him speechless, while he foamed profusely from the mouth and his limbs were twisted nearly out shape.
    On one occasion Elder Jeremy, on his way to attend a conference meeting at Myrther Tydfil, South Wales, was crossing a high mountain on a cold stormy day, together with a companion, who, in consequence of the ground being slippery, stumbled and dislocated his ankle. The young man, whose name was John Rice, and who had only been a member of the Church a short time, sat down by the roadside and wept, they being about seven miles from the nearest house, where they could procure any help.  Elder Jeremy explained the ordinance of the "laying on of hands" to Brother Rice, and promised him that if he had faith he could be healed. He then placed his hands upon the young man's head and commanded in the name of Jesus Christ that everything in his body which had been dislocated should be restored. He was immediately obeyed, and the young man, who was instantly healed, leaped to his feet, shouting for joy, after which the two continued their journey praising the Lord for the miraculous manifestation of His Power. The young man's ankle was as strong and well as before the accident and Elder Jeremy testifies that when he was administering to the young man, he plainly heard the bones in the dislocated ankle click together as if being set by some unseen physical power.
    On another occasion when Elder Jeremy was shooting at a flock of crows, the barrel of the gun bursted (burst) and one piece of it struck Elder Jeremy with such force in the forehead that he lost consciousness, and it was thought by those who saw him that he could not possibly live. Among the visitors on the occasion was a Baptist minister, who on seeing him, declared that if he could get well, he would be willing to acknowledge that there must be some extraordinary power connected with him and his people. Through the faith and prayers of the Elders, Brother Jeremy recovered so quickly that he was out preaching to the people the following Sunday, three days after the accident had taken place: one week later he baptized three persons. the Baptist preacher, however, refused to believe, and when Elder Jeremy exhibited several pieces of bone which had been extracted from the ghastly wound, this disbeliever in miracles wickedly insinuated that Elder Jeremy must have found some sheep bones in his field, and was trying to deceive the people. Elder Jeremy bore the scar from this accident in his forehead to his death, but experienced no inconvenience there from after the time he was first healed.
    In 1849, Elder Jeremy emigrated to Utah, with his family, consisting of his wife and seven children and three other persons, (one young girl and two young men) that he paid for, crossing the Atlantic in the ship "Buana Vista", which sailed from Liverpool, England, February 25th, 1849. In crossing the plains, the company in which he traveled was snowed in on the Sweetwater and before relief could be sent out from the Valley, the emigrants suffered much from cold and hunger. In one night seventy of their cattle died from cold and starvation.
    Elder Jeremy located with the Welsh Saints (Saints from Wells) west of the River Jordan, near Salt Lake City, but shortly afterwards settled in the Sixteenth Ward, Salt Lake City, Where he resided the reminder of his days. In 1849-52, he presided over the Welsh (Saints from Wells) meeting, which were held weekly in the city during that time. These meeting were often visited by some of the Apostles and were generally very spirited and interesting.
    In 1852 Elder Jeremy was called on a mission to his native country. He left home September 16th of that year, and after a severe journey across the plains and a stormy passage over the ocean, he arrived in Liverpool, England, December 24th, 1852 He was appointed to preside as pastor over three conferences, "Swansea, Llanelly and Caermatheen", and subsequently acted as counselor to Dan Jones., in the presidency of the Welsh Mission. After a successful mission, he returned home with a company of saints which sailed from Liverpool, England, in the ship "Chimborazo",  April 17th, 1855. On the voyage, he acted as a counselor to Edward Stevenson, the president of the company. During the few following years Elder Jeremy and family suffered considerably from scarcity of food, the grasshoppers destroyed the crops in the valley of Utah. As long as he had any bread-stuff, he divided liberally with his neighbors, and when all was gone, he stood his chance with the rest of the people in subsisting on roots and other things which could sustain life for a time. At the time of the general reformation in 1856 he took a very active part in preaching to the Welsh Saints and exhorting them to renewed diligence. Later (1857-1858), he participated in the expedition to Echo Canyon, making two trips out in the mountains. One of these he served as Captain of ten and on the other as Captain of a company: he suffered considerably from cold and over-exertion, and frequently had to make his bed on three feet of snow.
    In 1860 he was called on a mission to Europe. He arrived in Liverpool December 12th of that year and was appointed to preside over the Welsh Mission. While acting in that position for about three years and a half several thousand people joined the Church in Wales. George G. Bywater was his first and David M. Davis his second counselor. He finally returned home in charge of a large company of saints which sailed from Liverpool, on the ship "General M'Clellan" May 21st, 1964. In October following he was set apart to act as a member of the High Council in the Salt Lake Stake of Zion, a position which he occupied until May 1887, when he was released with honor because of his advanced years. Soon afterwards he was ordained a Patriarch. In November, 1875, he filled another mission to England, arriving in Liverpool December 1st of that year. He traveled among the branches in Wales, and also attended to some private business; returned home in March, 1976.
    Elder Jeremy was one of the faithful and true Elders who showed the same noble characteristics in times of prosperity as in time of adversity: he has ever been true to his God and his noble example will be held in honorable remembrance by future generations. Brother Jeremy died April 7th, 1891, in Salt Lake City, Utah.

The following line is hand written at the end of the paper
My Grand Mother Minnee Bosch Jeremy (Abrahamina Margrette Bosch Jeremy) was Thomas E Jeremy second wife.
I believe my Grand Mother Mina Geneva Brandly Wright wrote this line.

An Early Olsen/ Wardle/Wright Picture

James Wilford Wardle Sr, Melissa Shaw Wardle, Mina Geneve Brandli Wright, Ileen Wright Wardle, Donna Phyllis Wardle, Donna Olsen, Sara Wardle, Connie Wardle, Weldon Wardle, Ray Olsen

I do not know the circumstance, but this picture is taken at Grandma Wright's home in Lincoln.  Grandma Wright's husband was still alive when this picture, which is probably from 1956 (before I was born).

Saturday, March 15, 2014

My Brother Shared some more Shaw Pictures

Melissa Ann Atwood Shaw

My Father Osmond W. Shaw

Osmond Shaw and his dog Whiskers: Dad told me the dog name was Whiskers
Charlie added this story: Dad told me once getting a spanking from his grandpa Shaw. His grandpa Shaw told him not to go by some baby pigs. Dad did and got a spanking from Grandpa Shaw.