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Sunday, February 26, 2012

Uncle Robert William Springall


When I wrote my mom's history for er, she related the story of her half-brother Bob and his experience with the Bay Bridge.  I guess for a few hours the bridge belonged to my uncle.  He was born April 12, 1914.  His father passed away in 1925, and Grandmother remarried Grandfather Wright. 

            Mom explained to me the “sickness” of Uncle Bob.  It turns out that this occurred shortly after the Bay Bridge was completed linking San Francisco and Oakland.  This bridge opened for traffic November 12, 1936. (Wikepedia)  the ceremony opening the bridge was attended by U.S. President Herbert Hoover, California Senator William G. McAdoo and California Governor Frank Merriam.
            It must have been shortly after this ceremony that this event took place.  Apparently Uncle Bob had been drinking considerably.  In this state he took to the Bay Bridge, stopping traffic, and charging them a toll to cross.  He was going to use the money he collected to purchase more alcohol.  I am not sure if the bridge was a toll bridge then as it is now.
            Uncle Bob got into trouble with the law.  He apparently had problems with alcohol most of his life.
            He would come home from California often in the summer and work for the sugar beet campaign.  He most often worked at the factory.
            Uncle Bob, mom’s brother who played the saxophone, died young as a result of his alcohol.  He died August 8, 1961.  He was 47 at the time of his death.  He had hepatitis and kidney problems.  His funeral was in Lincoln.  His body had been shipped by train from Oakland. 
           


Chapter 3 Note 1

            Mom explained to me the “sickness” of Uncle Bob.  It turns out that this occurred shortly after the Bay Bridge was completed linking San Francisco and Oakland.  This bridge opened for traffic November 12, 1936. (Wikepedia)  the ceremony opening the bridge was attended by U.S. President Herbert Hoover, California Senator William G. McAdoo and California Governor Frank Merriam.
            It must have been shortly after this ceremony that this event took place.  Apparently Uncle Bob had been drinking considerably.  In this state he took to the Bay Bridge, stopping traffic, and charging them a toll to cross.  He was going to use the money he collected to purchase more alcohol.  I am not sure if the bridge was a toll bridge then as it is now.
            Uncle Bob got into trouble with the law.  He apparently had problems with alcohol most of his life.
            He would come home from California often in the summer and work for the sugar beet campaign.  He most often worked at the factory.
            Uncle Bob, mom’s brother who played the saxophone, died young as a result of his alcohol.  He died August 8, 1961.  He was 47 at the time of his death.  He had hepatitis and kidney problems.  His funeral was in Lincoln.  His body had been shipped by train from Oakland. 
           

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