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Monday, October 8, 2012

Reflections on Grandma Wright

From: Childhood Experiences of the Wardle Family, edited by Charlie Wardle
Reflections on my Grandmother, Mina Geneve Brandly Wright by: Sara Buff
Uncle Bill's Wedding, Grandpa and Grandma Wright on the left


    Grandma was always so very kind, just not to only a few but to all those she came in contact with.  I never remember a harsh word coming from her lips; she was a picture of patience, love and caring.  Grandma’s neighbors all had a great respect and love for her.  When she became ill and [too] old to care completely for herself they were always there to help.  And I know they were in their own way trying to pay Grandma back for all she had done for them. 
    Grandma was a marvelous cook.  My favorite was her steamed carrot pudding.  I can still remember the aroma that would fill her home when it was cooking.  Grandma loved to cook breakfast, and it didn’t matter what hour of the day we would get to her home, she would always ask, “Are you hungry?  Let me cook you something to eat.”  She was concerned about us after traveling for hours to visit with her.
    Grandma’s home was always neat and clean.  She had a big player piano in her living room, that I loved to make play.  Her home was modest and small but the atmosphere was so genuine.  As you walked into Grandma’s front door she had an entry way, where most of her treasured knickknacks were kept.  I would spend hours playing and imagining with them.  Then you would walk into a large formal dining room.  In this room I remember eating many Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners.  I remember the year I became old enough to eat with the adults and not with the children in the kitchen.  Our family spent many pleasant hours in this room.  Adjoining the formal dining room was the living room.  This is where I would sleep at nights on our visits.  Grandma had a green couch that folded down into a bed.  It wasn’t too comfortable but I didn’t care because I was with my grandma.  The next room was the kitchen.  It was really big with a table in the middle of the room.  I remember the huge kitchen sink.  It wasn’t divided so in order to rinse dishes a big pan was used for the rinse water.  Grandma always had food around and always cookies in the big cookie jar.  Off from the kitchen was her bedroom.  It was also a large room.  Grandma had a big bed; it was really high.  In this room she kept her sewing machine.  She was a good seamstress, and I still wear the aprons she made.  Then we venture into the bathroom.  I’d just about give anything if I had in my possession that big white bath tub.  It was so much fun; it was so deep like a swimming pool.  There was what was called the spare bedroom.  It was never spare when our family of six visited.  I remember it having two big beds in it.  It was the bedroom my mom shared with two other sisters.
    There are lots of memories with visiting in that old home with grandma.  I remember her telling me about her first husband and when they were living in Salt Lake and their home burned to the ground, and they lost everything and had to start all over.  Grandma had a lot of courage.  Grandma’s grandfather, Thomas E. Jeremy planted the first tree in one of the neighborhoods in Salt Lake, and I’ve had the opportunity to see that tree.
    Grandma loved flowers and being outside.  She had a lovely yard.  It was a lot of fun to play in.  She had a big pine tree that I could run under and hide. 
    Grandma was always honest, always paid her bills.  She didn’t want to be indebted to anyone.  Her honest was a great virtue.
    Grandma was about 5’4” and weighted around 160 lbs.  She had grey hair all the time I knew her.  When she was younger she had blond hair and was fair complected, the peaches and cream look.  My mom says I look a lot like her which is great.
    My grandmother died when she was 80 years old and I was 21 years old.  She had been a widow for 14 years.  My second child was only a few months old.  Her death left a great void in my life; but a few weeks before her death, my mom, my two children and I went to Lincoln, Idaho to spend a few days with her.  Thank goodness I remembered the camera and I took several pictures.  At her funeral I gave her life history.  She was my most favorite.  I guess you could say she’s my hero and I want to be just like her.  My second daughter carries her name, and often I tell my little Geneve stories about how wonderful her great-grandmother was.  I hope she can also carry the memories of this wonderful lady.

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